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The LaLaurie House (graphic!)
#51
Allow me set the record straight; most of what you read about the Lalaurie house is not true. The story goes that Madame LaLaurie was having a party at her house one night when a fire broke out in the kitchen. Guest of the party exited out to the street as police and fireman ran into the house knowing there were slaves in the attic. When they busted through the door to the attic they found slaves who were the victims of grotesque medical experiments. When the slaves were brought downstairs the guest of the party were so appalled by what they saw they ran back into the house to get Madame LaLaurie but in the nick of time she comes fleeing from the house in her carriage and escapes to Lake Pontchartrain to never be seen again.

Good story but it didn't happen that way. Most of the information about the house on the internet and sadly, used by tour guides, comes from a book written in the late 1800's about haunted New Orleans. The author took the liberty to greatly exaggerate the stories because it sold books.

In 1834, when the fire occurred, the house was only 2 stories, it did not have an attic. The kitchen and slave quarters were behind the house in a small 3 story building now referred to as the "apartments". The fire broke out in the day time and there was no party going on. Police and fireman did know there were slaves on the 3rd floor of the apartment and they did rescue them. What they found were slaves who were chained to the walls badly beating and malnourished. The slaves were taken from the house and brought to the Cabildo which sits on Jackson Square as they waited to be transported to a charity hospital. As word about the slaves spread people came to see them. They were so angered by what they saw that a mob formed and marched to the LaLaurie house hoping to make her pay for what she did. By the time they arrived she had already fled to a boat on Lake Pontchartrain which took her to Mobile, Alabama than a location on the east coast and then on to Paris where she lived out the remainder of her life.

The mob vandalized the house destroying and stealing everything they could. The house set vacant in ruins for years until new owners came along, renovated the house and added the 3rd floor. It’s been through numerous owners since. Nicolas Cage did buy the house and another in New Orleans in an area known as the "Garden District". When he ran into financial problems these were two of the houses he had to sell. The LaLaurie house has a new owner and he has spent six figures having the inside renovated and does not allow ghost hunters or tours inside the house.

Some other factoids, the current owner has not reported any paranormal activity inside the house nor has any past owner. If there is any paranormal activity to be found it will be in the apartment located behind the house. Her first two husbands died of natural causes. Dr. Lalaurie, her third husband, was 15 years younger than her. He was from France and moved to New Orleans to practice medicine when he graduated medical school. He was treating Madame LaLaurie's youngest daughter when they met. It is believed they had a courtship and she (Madame LaLaurie) became pregnant. The marriage was frowned down on because she was older than he and she was believed to be pregnant. Their marriage was rocky from the start and he spent very little time at the house or with her.

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#52
Yikes I have heard of this story a few times, fairly sad and creepy! Besides who would even want to visit that house with such a dark history I wouldn't mind avoiding it myself
Keep your feet on the ground, but let your heart soar as high as it will. Refuse to be average or to surrender to the chill of your spiritual environment. -Arthur Helps
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#53
Interesting portrayal of her by Kathy Bates, in Coven.

http://youtu.be/4kdoqbn4mTo
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#54
(08-09-2014, 11:15 PM)ChaosRose Wrote: Interesting portrayal of her by Kathy Bates, in Coven.

http://youtu.be/4kdoqbn4mTo

Loved her in AHS: Coven. I thought she and Angela Bassett was phenomenal.
Keep your feet on the ground, but let your heart soar as high as it will. Refuse to be average or to surrender to the chill of your spiritual environment. -Arthur Helps
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#55
Wonderful lady,I true inspiration.I loved her in Fried Green Tomatoes,& of course Misery.
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#56
Misery...... remember the hobbling scene? After she takes a sledge hammer to his feet, she looks at him, in all seriousness, as he's withering about in anguish, and with the upmost sincerity, " God, I love you!."
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#57
Lol yes & her quip lil sayings through out the movie.Mr.Man,or cockadoody car,or when she looks at him & says look at what you made me do.Ahhh classics priceless.
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#58
(08-16-2014, 09:46 AM)Itheblaze Wrote: Misery...... remember the hobbling scene? After she takes a sledge hammer to his feet, she looks at him, in all seriousness, as he's withering about in anguish, and with the upmost sincerity, " God, I love you!."

Oh dear me, I do remember watching that movie it was absolutely intense and one of the first I've actually seen. I remember cringing as the bones were dangling about after she sledge hammer them!
Keep your feet on the ground, but let your heart soar as high as it will. Refuse to be average or to surrender to the chill of your spiritual environment. -Arthur Helps
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#59
(07-27-2014, 09:39 PM)DLaville Wrote: Allow me set the record straight; most of what you read about the Lalaurie house is not true. The story goes that Madame LaLaurie was having a party at her house one night when a fire broke out in the kitchen. Guest of the party exited out to the street as police and fireman ran into the house knowing there were slaves in the attic. When they busted through the door to the attic they found slaves who were the victims of grotesque medical experiments. When the slaves were brought downstairs the guest of the party were so appalled by what they saw they ran back into the house to get Madame LaLaurie but in the nick of time she comes fleeing from the house in her carriage and escapes to Lake Pontchartrain to never be seen again.

Good story but it didn't happen that way. Most of the information about the house on the internet and sadly, used by tour guides, comes from a book written in the late 1800's about haunted New Orleans. The author took the liberty to greatly exaggerate the stories because it sold books.

In 1834, when the fire occurred, the house was only 2 stories, it did not have an attic. The kitchen and slave quarters were behind the house in a small 3 story building now referred to as the "apartments". The fire broke out in the day time and there was no party going on. Police and fireman did know there were slaves on the 3rd floor of the apartment and they did rescue them. What they found were slaves who were chained to the walls badly beating and malnourished. The slaves were taken from the house and brought to the Cabildo which sits on Jackson Square as they waited to be transported to a charity hospital. As word about the slaves spread people came to see them. They were so angered by what they saw that a mob formed and marched to the LaLaurie house hoping to make her pay for what she did. By the time they arrived she had already fled to a boat on Lake Pontchartrain which took her to Mobile, Alabama than a location on the east coast and then on to Paris where she lived out the remainder of her life.

The mob vandalized the house destroying and stealing everything they could. The house set vacant in ruins for years until new owners came along, renovated the house and added the 3rd floor. It’s been through numerous owners since. Nicolas Cage did buy the house and another in New Orleans in an area known as the "Garden District". When he ran into financial problems these were two of the houses he had to sell. The LaLaurie house has a new owner and he has spent six figures having the inside renovated and does not allow ghost hunters or tours inside the house.

Some other factoids, the current owner has not reported any paranormal activity inside the house nor has any past owner. If there is any paranormal activity to be found it will be in the apartment located behind the house. Her first two husbands died of natural causes. Dr. Lalaurie, her third husband, was 15 years younger than her. He was from France and moved to New Orleans to practice medicine when he graduated medical school. He was treating Madame LaLaurie's youngest daughter when they met. It is believed they had a courtship and she (Madame LaLaurie) became pregnant. The marriage was frowned down on because she was older than he and she was believed to be pregnant. Their marriage was rocky from the start and he spent very little time at the house or with her.

And where does your information come from?

'A phantom,' said my Uncle Mycroft, who had just materialised, 'is essentially a heteromorphic wave pattern that gains solidity when the apparition converts thermal energy from the surroundings to visible light. It's a fascinating process and I'm amazed no one has thought of harnessing it - a holographic TV that could operate from the heat given off by an average-size guinea pig.' ~ First Among Sequels, Jasper Fforde
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#60
(07-27-2014, 09:39 PM)DLaville Wrote: Allow me set the record straight

Your accounting of "what really happened" doesn't include graphic details of what was found. That part is very, horribly true-- the newspaper article actually calls Mdm. LaLaurie "a demon, in the shape of a woman" and describes the horrific state of the slaves (though the newspaper refrains from details... just general horridness). Mind you, I expect the story to be a little exaggerated over time.

Yes, there was no party. Yes, there was a fire. Yes, the slaves were chained up and locked away during the fire.

I wasn't aware the house had been added on... but it stands to reason-- it's an old house. Though, I find it a little odd that the "apartment" would tower over the main house. That's not very common for slave quarters to dwarf the owner's mansion... so I find that difficult to believe.

I'm interested in your source as well for purely historical reasons-- Years ago, I located the article in the New Orleans Bee archives for April 11, 1834. So it did happen, and it was documented.

... if anyone else is interested in reading for yourself, you can find the article here:
http://nobee.jefferson.lib.la.us/Vol-009/index.html

Look for the file: 1834_04_034.pdf

Once you open the pdf file, the article is in the upper left corner of the page, and the first sentence (which is rather difficult to read) begins:

"The conflagration at the house occupied by the woman LaLaurie in Hospital St. has been the means of discovering one of those atrocities the details of which seem to be too incredible for human belief."
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