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Electrical radiation of unwanted signals.
07-16-2017, 05:17 AM
Post: #1
Electrical radiation of unwanted signals.
Electronic noise transmission is an issue that has a big impact on recording & anyone wanting to use an EMF meter.
Right across the bands from sound (Hz) to light (GHz) noise from poorly designed & built equipment is radiating signals that are damaging others activities.
The laws from country to country do vary. But in the main what we are talking about is equipment being sold that radiates unwanted & unneeded radio signals, which not only can, but which do interfere with recording equipment among other things.
Everything from light bulbs to heating & cooling systems, to switch mode power supplies to power line transmission systems, can radiate signals & sometimes over a wide area.
The raising level of noise means that any EVP taken where the buildings electrical system has not been switched off & isolated cannot be taken seriously. The same for anyone using an EMF meter. How do you know it's not something explainable, if you do not know what could be happening electrically or what is being measured?
https://interferencetechnology.com/fcc-w...ise-floor/
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Quote:Many devices emit radio frequency energy that could interfere with radio services and increase the noise floor.

Quote:There are two broad product categories that appear to be the dominant emissions sources: electronic lighting (including CFL, LED, and halogen) and switch mode power supplies. Many of these originate from offshore manufacturers and many of those are marked as complying with FCC Part 15 or 18 but don’t actually meet the standards. Even those that do comply still produce large levels of broadband noise across much of the spectrum below 200 MHz. The FCC wishes to study changes to the noise floor from human-made sources over the past 20 years.

http://www.radioworld.com/columns-and-vi...dio/339995

Quote:Background noise interference is degrading the quality of broadcast reception, two-way communications, mobile cellphone services and every other form of wireless communications used today at an alarming rate.
The FCC and the ITU agree that the DC to 60 GHz+ wide-spectrum background noise floor is increasing as more and more unregulated electronic devices are used by more consumers in more ways every day.

Quote:In August 2016, Jack Sellmeyer, P.E., and I measured the electric field intensity and the associated (power cord) impulse noise voltages produced by various LED lights that we purchased off the shelf at a Home Depot that resulted from the lack of filter components in the lamps. One of the lights we tested was a Phillips 100 W LED light bulb.
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07-16-2017, 05:22 AM
Post: #2
RE: Electrical radiation of unwanted signals.
Plus the fact most digital recorder manual warns of receiving and emitting RF. Then the recorder also picking up its own circuitry switching.
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07-16-2017, 07:59 AM
Post: #3
RE: Electrical radiation of unwanted signals.
Could not have said and illustrated it better myself!

(07-16-2017 05:17 AM)Kayt Wrote:  The laws from country to country do vary. But in the main what we are talking about is equipment being sold that radiates unwanted & unneeded radio signals, which not only can, but which do interfere with recording equipment among other things.
Everything from light bulbs to heating & cooling systems, to switch mode power supplies to power line transmission systems, can radiate signals & sometimes over a wide area.

Quote:There are two broad product categories that appear to be the dominant emissions sources: electronic lighting (including CFL, LED, and halogen)...

It has been noted hundreds of times that the U.S. FCC doesn't have the manpower and resources to test every piece of electrical/ electronic gear being used in the U.S. The volume is just too huge. There are definitely vast numbers of gear that don't comply, from computers in plastic cases to cell phones

Add to this something that I noted in another thread. If a strong source of interference is being picked up; electric lights for example, it is possible for a radio signal to "hitchhike" on the interference frequency and be picked up as voices or music. This is very prevalent with AM radio as they are typically the stronger wattage stations and the signals carry farther than the FM bands. AM stations typically broadcast talk shows.

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07-16-2017, 08:36 AM (This post was last modified: 07-16-2017 08:38 AM by Kayt.)
Post: #4
RE: Electrical radiation of unwanted signals.
(07-16-2017 07:59 AM)Darkforeboding Wrote:  It has been noted hundreds of times that the U.S. FCC doesn't have the manpower and resources to test every piece of electrical/ electronic gear being used in the U.S. The volume is just too huge. There are definitely vast numbers of gear that don't comply, from computers in plastic cases to cell phones.

The UK is in a worse situation as Ofcom does absolutely nothing about most things.


(07-16-2017 07:59 AM)Darkforeboding Wrote:  Add to this something that I noted in another thread. If a strong source of interference is being picked up; electric lights for example, it is possible for a radio signal to "hitchhike" on the interference frequency and be picked up as voices or music. This is very prevalent with AM radio as they are typically the stronger wattage stations and the signals carry farther than the FM bands. AM stations typically broadcast talk shows.

Yes & no. What happens is that you get what is called mixing. So a strong signal mixes with the internal circuitry to produce a second frequency.
The reality is, if it's a strong signal it can overload your equipment & pop up in all sorts of unwanted ways.
And I would suggest that Mobile Phone masts are the biggest issue, they exist within residential areas & operate at fairly high power levels. In general a broadcast transmitter is not too close to residential properties.

When electronic equipment is designed it should be done, so that what is called EMC (ElectroMagnetic Compatability) regulations & requirements are taken into account.
For example if it's say a heart monitor, you would put every concievable protection in place & very carefully shield each section of the electronics from the other. While if you were designing a digital recorder, you may take no precautions.
An LED light bulb, should have filtering, but often does not. As it saves a few pence. The same with lots of other home electronics.
In effect there are two types of EMC precautions. The type you use to prevent it happening to you & the type you use to prevent your equipment causing EMC issues to others.
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